A Drawing A Day 0014

Random drawing I did today or just very recently relating to the free “Introduction To Drawing” and / or the Figure Drawing Course lectures. This may be just a post of a drawing itself, or with a short commentary (my preferred option), or even a video where I can also draw to clarify the points.
This is to encourage your drawing practices, to support and shorten your learning curve, and to invite you to post your artwork (in the “Student Work” category) where others can comment and everyone coming to the site and blog benefits. Happy Drawing!

The following is a graphite drawing on Simili Japon 225gsm paper 48cm x 32cm (18.9in x 12.5in), drawing time 25 minutes

It will help at the beginning, or even later when your intent is to study the nude to make the drawing of the human form transparent. A kind of see through. On the drawing below I started with positioning the head quite a bit higher. You can see by the extra lines on the top and back of the skull where the original position was. But it did not feel right. The fastest and easiest way (no point making this harder than it absolutely has to be) of finding a better feeling place for the head was to draw it disregarding the shoulder and the upper arm. This helped to judge how far would the shoulders rise above the rib cage in this pose. The neck is kind of wedged between the raised shoulders. X-ray vision is a good thing.

I did the same thing with finding the, pubis of the pelvis as this, in turn, would help to position the model’s left leg.
So I found the origin of the left leg and in the vein of what I talk about in the video on the Three Basic Rules, (yet again to make this experience as painless as possible) the first shape you put down on the paper will determine the position, size, rotation….of the next shape through their relationship (Rule Nr 3). So, if you draw the rib cage first, then the pelvis, then the head, you don’t want to stop and find, that while the head and pelvis work well together (belong to the same body in the same space) the rib cage is too small (or too large). Because then you have to go back and change the it. And if you don’t get it right, but you like it, then you need to change the other two to make it fit….. can you see the potential for a disaster?
When drawing the next geometric shape you have to be keenly aware of the size, shape and position in space of the shape before it. Have to constantly compare (relationships!) and, of course, the more shapes you have on the paper, the more information you have to keep in view not to go astray. Then you end up with a nice construction. Focusing on any detail before you have a body belonging to the space it is drawn in, having appropriate weight and attitude, will kill the process. You might end up with a nice detail, just not the body it should belong to. Okay, you get he picture.
So, I found the origin of the left leg easily because of the pubic bone of the pelvis (not drawn, only indicated) and now in order to make it work, I am watching all the attributes of the existing shapes and judging the perspective of the floor while recalling what the bones and muscles of the leg look like in this position, under this physical exercise.

All this sounds hard and complicated, but I do all this subconsciously, because I have been doing all of this for a little while. And so will you. In a little while. Just have to stick to the simple stuff you are able to hold in your attention for a bit. Like geometric shapes. ;–))

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And a bit more shading.
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A Drawing A Day 0013

Random drawing I did today or just very recently relating to the free “Introduction To Drawing” and / or the Figure Drawing Course lectures. This may be just a post of a drawing itself, or with a short commentary (my preferred option), or even a video where I can also draw to clarify the points.
This is to encourage your drawing practices, to support and shorten your learning curve, and to invite you to post your artwork (in the “Student Work” category) where others can comment and everyone coming to the site and blog benefits. Happy Drawing!

The following is a graphite drawing on Simili Japon 225gsm paper 48cm x 32cm (18.9in x 12.5in)

If you have been looking at these drawings for the last 2 weeks, I think you start readily seeing what kind of shapes I am using for which parts of the body. However, these drawings are just examples of the process, they are not a prescribed set of geometric shapes to be used for a particular part of the body. Once you grasp the concept you have to make your own decisions. It is down to your artistic sensibilities, life experience, time of the day, sun or rain and anything else that makes an impression on you. The important bit to remember right now is the fact that the fitting shapes you would choose change all the time. With the change in pose, from model to model, even within a larger shape itself. Flexed muscles beg for a different solution to relaxed muscles. Endless variety. That’s what makes it so rewarding. Every time you look at a body, it is different. It is a brand new statement.
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Above, showing on the model’s left forearm, there are shapes embedded in the larger shapes.
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A Drawing A Day 0012

Random drawing I did today or just very recently relating to the free “Introduction To Drawing” and / or the Figure Drawing Course lectures. This may be just a post of a drawing itself, or with a short commentary (my preferred option), or even a video where I can also draw to clarify the points.
This is to encourage your drawing practices, to support and shorten your learning curve, and to invite you to post your artwork (in the “Student Work” category) where others can comment and everyone coming to the site and blog benefits. Happy Drawing!

The following is a graphite drawing on Simili Japon 225gsm paper 32 x 48cm  (12.5in x 18.9in)
Different model, different pose – same process.
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Notice how I corrected the shape and position of the model’s left lower leg. In the image above it is strangely protruding past the position it should be – should be somewhat behind the knee.  In the image below I have improved on it by moving it.
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And a little more developed version below.
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A Drawing A Day 0011

Random drawing I did today or just very recently relating to the free “Introduction To Drawing” and / or the Figure Drawing Course lectures. This may be just a post of a drawing itself, or with a short commentary (my preferred option), or even a video where I can also draw to clarify the points.
This is to encourage your drawing practices, to support and shorten your learning curve, and to invite you to post your artwork (in the “Student Work” category) where others can comment and everyone coming to the site and blog benefits. Happy Drawing!

The following is a graphite drawing on Simili Japon 225gsm paper 48cm x 32cm  (18.9in x 12.5in)
With this drawing I took a few more progress shots. It is quite interesting how this works. Because I have done the shapes stuff for a while, mostly I get by just using vague indication of them. So as I draw, I focus on the drawing, not on the teaching process. And get carried away as I enjoy myself. Then I kind of reverse engineer the whole thing once it is done to show some of the thought processes about the geometric shapes. Now I have reminded myself to stop and take shots before the drawing is established. So there is a bit more to talk about today.
0011_IMG_8124_1_wo0011_IMG_8124_1a_woAbove, you can see how the simplest geometric shape concept changes into a more and more refined one to accommodate the actual shape on the body. The video on the www.figuredrawingonline.com about this process actually depicts the very basic, first pass of shaping – so to speak. But what you see above follows once you are comfortable with the bare basics. Once you do not have to think whether to choose a rectangular shape of a box or a rounded shape of an elongated ball, then your thinking is freed up to refine the shape. There is of course, a whole set of refinements and the more you know about the shape you are drawing the faster you jump forward to a shape that is closer and closer to what you want to express.

Ok, the next stage:
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Here is another demonstration of altering the basic flattened cylinder to a one that has a bump on the front of it and then dividing the bump into two parts and then reshaping the bottom edge of it to get a nice version of the lower portion of Rectus Abdominis with a hint of the External Oblique on each side.
Also, notice the simple dissection of the model’s left foot. A cylinder coming down, blended into a ball blended into a cube. Quite simple once it is taken apart, isn’t it?
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Notice, that it is only now, at this stage that I have added the Shoulder Girdle – the cluster made of the arm, the scapulae at the back and the clavicles in the front. I could have done it earlier as I know intimately how unreliable it is to look at it to determine the position of the rib cage in space. In fact there is a video on this very common mistake in the section of…well…Common Mistakes. It is called The deceit of the Shoulder Girdle.
Also, there’s another example of the blending of shapes above. This time the models right arm. A ball like shape of Deltoideus blending into the upper arm blending into a somehow complex ball of the elbow and then blending into a cylinder of the lower arm which in turn morphs into a cube at it’s lower end. If it not obvious, please note, that all of these shapes working so nicely to represent the arm, work only in this particular position of this very arm. Should the position of the said arm change, all the shapes would change and / or end up being replaced by different shapes. Do you see now why I insist on sticking to the shapes for the time being till they are become truly your own vocabulary?
For those woking with 3D apps, the shape of the model’s right foot might make more sense if you are used to think in terms of polygons. But it is the same concept. I just fused some of the parts together.
And above there is also a detached breast to show you what happens to the ball like shape of it when it is embedded into the rounded, cylinder like shape of the rib cage.
0011_IMG_8124_4_wo0011_IMG_8124_4a_woAbove is the simple shape of the head with a line running from it’s top to bottom to show the slight turn of the head to the left of the picture. And a fused shape of the chest following the curve of the ribs at it’s bottom part, cutting the Pectoralis Major at the top at the point where it would disappear under the deltoideus (on both sides) to be inserted into the humerus bone of the upper arm. Sternum is indicated between the two halfs.

Then adding a bit more shading.
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And a bit more with a few extra studies to use the paper efficiently. ;–))
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A Drawing A Day 0010

Random drawing I did today or just very recently relating to the free “Introduction To Drawing” and / or the Figure Drawing Course lectures. This may be just a post of a drawing itself, or with a short commentary (my preferred option), or even a video where I can also draw to clarify the points.
This is to encourage your drawing practices, to support and shorten your learning curve, and to invite you to post your artwork (in the “Student Work” category) where others can comment and everyone coming to the site and blog benefits. Happy Drawing!

The following is a graphite drawing on Simili Japon 225gsm paper 48cm x 32cm  (18.9″ x 12.5″)
By now, I suspect you’d like to see something else, something other than simple geometric shapes. But that’s just it. Nothing happens without them. Get these right and 75% of your drawing difficulties disappear. Clearly the more you do these exercises, the better you’ll get at them, but it is an ongoing engagement. The human body is way too complex to run out of new ways of drawing the same number of muscles and bones. And that, I suppose is also the pleasure of it. The start might be daunting, frustrating, full of doubts…but once you get past a certain point and you start creating with what you already know, there’s no stopping the joy. Then the geometric shapes are not an obligation. They are your new best friend and you can’t get enough of them. Want some more? ;–))
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A Drawing A Day 0009

Random drawing I did today or just very recently relating to the free “Introduction To Drawing” and / or the Figure Drawing Course lectures. This may be just a post of a drawing itself, or with a short commentary (my preferred option), or even a video where I can also draw to clarify the points.
This is to encourage your drawing practices, to support and shorten your learning curve, and to invite you to post your artwork (in the “Student Work” category) where others can comment and everyone coming to the site and blog benefits. Happy Drawing!

The following is a graphite drawing on Simili Japon 225gsm paper 32cm x 48cm (12.5″ x 18.9″)
Continuing in the same vein.
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A Drawing A Day 0008

Random drawing I did today or just very recently relating to the free “Introduction To Drawing” and / or the Figure Drawing Course lectures. This may be just a post of a drawing itself, or with a short commentary (my preferred option), or even a video where I can also draw to clarify the points.
This is to encourage your drawing practices, to support and shorten your learning curve, and to invite you to post your artwork (in the “Student Work” category) where others can comment and everyone coming to the site and blog benefits. Happy Drawing!

The following is a graphite drawing on Simili Japon 225gsm paper 48cm x 32cm (18.9″ x 12.5″)
This one is another 20 minutes long study in building a body on the ground. I know the article on foreshortening is not ready yet, so I’ll wait with talking about that. The lying down figure does present a different view of the human figure than what we are used to on a daily basis. So in some ways it is easier to see the geometric shapes as we have to think about what we see instead of just glancing over a familiar view of, say…a standing nude.

It is always the same – the need to make the observed form conscious until we know any part of the body in any view so well, we are freed up to create with them straight out of our imagination. In fact that is the end goal.
It is nice to have a model or at least a photo reference of a nude body to guide us while we can discover all kinds of visual delights, but the utmost creative satisfaction comes from experiencing an image appearing in our mind conjured up from a lifetime of ingested imagery and from what lies beyond our sensory perception, an image charged with content and emotion and being able to draw it. And for that we need the language of the forms of the body in a manageable system of geometric shapes. Whoa….that was a mouthful. But, you know what I mean, right?
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A Drawing A Day 0007

Random drawing I did today or just very recently relating to the free “Introduction To Drawing” and / or the Figure Drawing Course lectures. This may be just a post of a drawing itself, or with a short commentary (my preferred option), or even a video where I can also draw to clarify the points.
This is to encourage your drawing practices, to support and shorten your learning curve, and to invite you to post your artwork (in the “Student Work” category) where others can comment and everyone coming to the site and blog benefits. Happy Drawing!

The following is a graphite drawing on Simili Japon 225gsm paper 32cm x 48cm (12.5″ x 18.9″)
Again, more examples of simplifying complex form into simple geometric shapes. The very basis of Figure Drawing. It allows the grasp of the form. Otherwise it is way too complex to be thought of, let alone drawn. These are all short drawings, 15 – 20 minutes at most to reach the last version in the line of images. Their purpose is to develop a subconscious, instinctive ability to identify the best shape to represent a part of the body. To get there one has to draw a lot of these while thinking about the process. Since the thinking is taken up by it, there isn’t much space left for anything else to be considered.
Drawing in my class starts with short poses. 10 x 1 minute pose, 5 x 2 minutes, 2 x 5 minutes, 2 x 10 minutes and I really don’t want to go past 20 minutes length for the long poses. The short poses are there to warm up the students. But they also have a function of forcing the students to look for the large shapes of the body. There is no time to do anything else in 60 seconds. If you think about the details you run out of time before you could draw anything meaningful.
In every single class one or more students get “sucked in” by the detail in the longer poses. And I always remind them to treat the long poses as a 1 minute one to begin with. Get the large shapes on the paper, establish the large forms, their position in space and relationship to each other – The Three basic Rules – and they always manage to snap out of the spell. Then, when the drawing is already convincing, only then spend the time on the fanciful detail.
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For those who want to focus on realistic figure drawing, as opposed to generic drawing (landscapes, still life…), the study of the skeletal structure is of great importance.0007_IMG_8059_3_wo

A Drawing A Day 0006

Random drawing I did today or just very recently relating to the free “Introduction To Drawing” and / or the Figure Drawing Course lectures. This may be just a post of a drawing itself, or with a short commentary (my preferred option), or even a video where I can also draw to clarify the points.
This is to encourage your drawing practices, to support and shorten your learning curve, and to invite you to post your artwork (in the “Student Work” category) where others can comment and everyone coming to the site and blog benefits. Happy Drawing!

The following is a graphite drawing on tinted Simili Japon 225gsm paper 47cm x 32cm (18.5″ x 13.5″)
I’d like to continue in the same line of thought as up to now. Partly because it is so important to get used to these techniques of simplifications and partly I don’t want to start pointing out things for which the articles are not ready as yet.
I did the same thing with this drawing as with the others, however when I visualise the simple geometric shapes I also, at the same time, adapt them to what fits the drawing best. So if the cylindrical shape has a narrower bit I reshape the basic geometry to fit the need. Then join the reshaped geometry and that gives the body the outline as it is below:
0006_IMG_8045_8047_1_woHere are the basic shapes:
0006_IMG_8045_8047_1a_woThen I added a bit of shading:
0006_IMG_8045_8047_2_woAnd a bit more of the lines for shading:
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A Drawing A Day 0005

Random drawing I did today or just very recently relating to the free “Introduction To Drawing” and / or the Figure Drawing Course lectures. This may be just a post of a drawing itself, or with a short commentary (my preferred option), or even a video where I can also draw to clarify the points.
This is to encourage your drawing practices, to support and shorten your learning curve, and to invite you to post your artwork (in the “Student Work” category) where others can comment and everyone coming to the site and blog benefits. Happy Drawing!

The following is a graphite drawing on tinted Fabriano Academia 200gsm paper 50cm x 35cm (19.6″ x 13.7″)
This drawing continues in the all important vein of simplifying the complex form into basic geometric shapes. Then in the last image a small reminder of how easy it is to push too far. Knowing when to stop is just as important.
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A Drawing A Day 0004

Random drawing I did today or just very recently relating to the free “Introduction To Drawing” and / or the Figure Drawing Course lectures. This may be just a post of a drawing itself, or with a short commentary (my preferred option), or even a video where I can also draw to clarify the points.
This is to encourage your drawing practices, to support and shorten your learning curve, and to invite you to post your artwork (in the “Student Work” category) where others can comment and everyone coming to the site and blog benefits. Happy Drawing!

The following is a graphite drawing on paper 32cm x 48cm (12.59″ x 18.89″)
I took a progress shot first, as this described best the use of simple geometric shapes and then I took the study a bit further showing again the importance of training the lightness of your hand. If you do, there’s quite a bit you can change in a drawing even if you choose to use the supporting lines of the geometric shapes to guide you. Apart from these I also used the shape of the rib cage and the shape of the ball representing the pelvis is slightly shaped in the form of the underlying pelvis. In figure drawing your geometric forms will progressively blend into the skeletal structures and you will be able to choose on the fly the shape that does the best job in representing what you want to show to the viewer.
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0004_IMG_8020_8024_commented_woAll three images have exactly the same “levels” setting in Photoshop so that the comparison for the disappearance of the supporting lines is possible.
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A Drawing A Day 0003

Random drawing I did today or just very recently relating to the free “Introduction To Drawing” and / or the Figure Drawing Course lectures. This may be just a post of a drawing itself, or with a short commentary (my preferred option), or even a video where I can also draw to clarify the points.
This is to encourage your drawing practices, to support and shorten your learning curve, and to invite you to post your artwork (in the “Student Work” category) where others can comment and everyone coming to the site and blog benefits. Happy Drawing!

The following is a graphite drawing on paper 32cm x 27cm (12.59″ x 10.62″)
0003_IMG_8019_clean_woA study in constructing the body from simple geometric shapes. I am trying to keep the shading down to a bare minimum. This is to guide you more towards seeing shapes rather than light and shade. Where I use it, I use it to emphasise the shape of the geometry. I don’t want to enter into the “shading world” as yet, but that is exactly what shading is supposed to do. To support the form. A really good form can support itself with no shading at all. That’s where the pure line drawing comes in. All of that is still coming in the free articles and videos section.

To come back to the shading I used in this drawing, please observe that all of it is made of lines. There’s no blotches, smudges, finger rubbing…. If possible, it would be good to refrain from those. Use lines. If you do, you will have to make a decision about where to put your lines, how hard should they be drawn, what direction should they run, how many, how close to each other…. That means you will have to think about how to support the illusion of the three dimensionality of the form on the two dimensional sheet of paper. Wonderful. A figure drawing.

Here are some more examples of the use of simple geometric shapes. This is really important. In fact the three rules are the most important part of figure and any other drawing. If you don’t get this right, nothing you add will work. Practise these and you will be amazed how fast your progress will be.
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A Drawing A Day 0002

Random drawing I did today or just very recently relating to the free “Introduction To Drawing” and / or the Figure Drawing Course lectures. This may be just a post of a drawing itself, or with a short commentary (my preferred option), or even a video where I can also draw to clarify the points.
This is to encourage your drawing practices, to support and shorten your learning curve, and to invite you to post your artwork (in the “Student Work” category) where others can comment and everyone coming to the site and blog benefits. Happy Drawing!

The following is a black chalk drawing, 48cm x 32cm (18.8″ x 12.5″).
IMG_8015_11102014_clean_woOk, with this one, there are a couple of things I can point out. First of all I am proving my own statement about multitasking. So I sit down and while I draw this 10 minutes long sketch, my mind is wondering all over the place thinking about some urgent matter. Multitasking, ha?
I have drawn for a while, so even with a seriously wondering mind I do produce something. But I finish and look at it (this time with my mind present) and I get annoyed. But then, I remind myself, this is actually a good thing, and we are here to learn.

The first thing that I see is that this is a woman made up of several bodies. The head, the upper torso and the arms belong to one woman, then the pelvic region and the upper legs come from another woman and then the right lower leg and foot are borrowed from the third person. It’s not immediately obvious, it just feels a bit odd. This is what I call the drawing not being convincing. It is a drawing, it is kind of ok, but…errrrr….not really. Then you see what is wrong with it and you cannot unsee it. Now you cannot stop seeing how bad it is, in fact.
The cause in this case is not really what some call the proportions. I think in this case inconsistency in size of the different body parts comes form a misjudgement of perspective, and the sizes are just a consequence.
Anyway, I think unconsciously (while my mind was in la–la land) I was seeing the problem because of the way I approached the need to place the chair on the same floor as the feet. In fact I drew the right foot first, then I drew the chair and after that the left foot. But you can see how I used the rectangular shape on the floor representing the bottom of a cube to work out the perspective.
Now, there is yet another problem that is ruining the illusion of this lady. This problem is very well explained and discussed in the free video called The Loss Of Volume. Let me show you what I mean in this drawing:
IMG_8015_11102014_commented_woIf I take the left side of the torso as accurate in size and shape, then I have cut off quite a bit of the right hand side of it. In terms of simplest possible geometric shapes, the right side of the torso, the shoulder and the right upper arm are really just three cylinders meeting in the green ball like shape of the deltoideus. If you follow the right hand side of the torso, the oragne line climbing up and under the armpit is what restores the torso to its rightful size. This also pushed the right upper arm, where it meets the deltoideus further out to make room. It’s not a big change in terms of measurements, but it makes all the difference. This little adjustment also creates the illusion of the torso being more rotated and lends the pose quite a bit of extra character.

So there it is. The wondering mind.

A Drawing A Day 0001

Random drawing I did today or just very recently relating to the free “Introduction To Drawing” and / or the Figure Drawing Course lectures. This may be just a post of a drawing itself, or with a short commentary (my preferred option), or even a video where I can also draw to clarify the points.
This is to encourage your drawing practices, to support and shorten your learning curve, and to invite you to post your artwork (in the “Student Work” category) where others can comment and everyone coming to the site and blog benefits. Happy Drawing!

The following is a black chalk drawing on tinted paper, 20cm x 35cm (7.8″ x 13.7″). I want to mention (although the articles about this in the “Introduction To Drawing” are still pending) how important it is to train your hand to be light. I had to put the image through Photoshop to improve visibility of the lines. If the lines you draw are light, you have options. You can still change things without loosing the drawing.
P1030847_clean_weboptBut the main thing I want to point out is about the “Three Basic Rules”, especially the second one about simplifying complex forms into simple geometric shapes. More about this is also mentioned in the “Grasping The Complex” article and then the video below that article.
P1030847_commented_webopt1/ The side of the torso can very well be represented by a simple cylinder. My cylinder has a few alterations on it, such as a change in diameter (thickness) and a bend. These are the details you can add later. After you have decided the shape will be well represented by a cylinder, you have visualised it in your mind and know what lines to draw to get it on the paper. At that stage you may pause: Are there any smaller variations about the basic cylinder with which I could even better represent this shape on the torso? And if you can name the variations, then you have a mental image of them and you can draw them.
Note: This is a very meticulous dissection of the process so that it can be understood. The moment you start using it, you’d be surprised how fast it disappears into the subconscious and leaves you free to focus on the drawing itself rather than how to draw it.

2/ The next example is about combining a cylinder with a cube–like shape in the middle of it. I have used it to quickly represent the bottom part of the long head of triceps, which would bulge considerably in this position. The same muscle is embedded in the general shape of the upper arm, which is cylinder–like. Therefore the combination of the two seemed the best to convey the shape, rotation and orientation of the upper arm. Of course, this cylinder meets at the top of the upper arm the ball like shape of the deltoideus. There’s a tiny line drawn with more force to show the deltoideus overlaping the triceps.

3/ The egg–like shape in the example number three explains the shape of another bulging muscle. You can find the muscles of the shoulder girdle explained in detail in the Figure Drawing Course, but you can also find the basics in the free Lecture on the Shoulder.

4/ Example number four is again a combination of the general cylidrical shape of the lower leg and the ball like protrusion of the bottom bit of fibula.

5/ Egg like shape describes very well the gastrocnemius group at that back of the lower leg.

6/ Here is a good example of using a triangle to represent the foot.

And there’s another one I did not number. The series of cubes to make the fingers easy to position in space.
So there it is. If your lines are light (which they will be in time with practise), most of these indications of geometric shapes would disappear into the further developed drawing.

A Drawing A Day

Hello everyone,

Ever since I started working on the free “Introduction To Drawing” content, I’ve been thinking about the best way to communicate the concepts of drawing. How to hand it over.
So, there are the articles that verbally explain what you need to be thinking about when drawing and why. Then there are the videos with demonstration of the content of the articles. There’s quite a bit of free videos on the site as well, the “Common Mistakes” edition, the “Work In Progress” episodes, the cut down versions of all the 13 Lectures, but it still felt to me a bit disconnected.

Another thing I really wanted to be understood is, that most of the drawings by far anyone does, are studies. As the name implies, these are opportunities where the artist undertakes his study of the human form. By default this means a stack of messy drawings geared towards discovering the next gem we are ready to see. Perhaps a line sitting exactly where needs to be. An example of nice massing. An expression of body language that leaves no doubt about an internal life of the figure. These discoveries are the building blocks of the visual language we are learning. You absorb these visual expressions and when you own them, you use them to create your “clean” artwork that will be exhibited. Naturally from time to time there will be a study that can be accepted as finished artwork. That would contain so much aliveness that the messiness will not matter. But that is up to each of you to decide what is an accomplished drawing and what is a quiet discovery.

So thinking about the disconnection – the not “enoughness” of the examples demonstrating Figure Drawing as I intended – as a peek over the shoulder, plus wanting you to look for the gems in your studies, I have decided to post a drawing a day. Perhaps I should say “A Study A Day” as most of them will be studies. These will be random drawings I did the same day or just a few days ago. They will be showing what I am preoccupied with. They may be just posts by themselves (especially if the time is short) or they may have a bit of a commentary (my preferred option) particularly linking by example into the “Introduction To Drawing” or even into the Figure Drawing Course lectures. Occasionaly they might be show in a form of a video where I can also draw to clarify the points. I have created a new Category called “A Drawing A Day” and each post will be numbered so they are easy to find if you want to refer back to a particular drawing. I will attemp to post the drawings at around the same time of the day so the publishing can become a daily cycle.

So there it is. Now, I am also hoping that this will encourage you to post your drawings and get from your fellow subscribers a feedback that will benefit everyone reading the posts. And remember: There is no such thing as a bad drawing.

Tomorrow.

Free Online Drawing Lessons

Hello everyone. Great news!

The first part of the new Free Online Drawing Resource is now ready. Introducing extra material has changed the website design and layout a bit, which means things have slightly moved around. I believe, the new navigation will be easy to use. I have placed the warning of nude content on the first page that loads (animated intro), and viewing of the Disclaimer is now optional as a pop up window. Clicking on “Learn To Draw With” and/or “The Ultimate Figure Drawing Course” are links to enter the site. All the pages now have a navigation bar at the top for quick access to everything.
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The “Home” page starts the free education section of the site. In the column on the left, below your testimonials are also the links to all the articles and video tutorials of the free “Introduction To Drawing”. This also gives a visual sense of the structure of these tutorials. The links in orange are live and have content.
Screen-Shot-2014-10-06-at-16.35_woptIn the last article (“Drawing Step By Step”) I have published the list of the planed free online drawing lessons. As you will see on the site, the list of these articles and video tutorials has slightly changed. The change, however, is not in content. Only in form. If I felt some of the topics were related or even dependent on each other in terms of learning to draw, I grouped them under a single topic. So everything you asked for is still there, or coming soon, as it has been announced.

In the same article I also said it will take some time to compile all the lessons, articles and videos. However, the first of the 5 groups of tutorials is ready and so I chose to release these, so those who want to, can start. The rest of the 5 groups will follow progressively.

In the menu bar, the “Learning” tab is for the free “Introduction To Drawing”, and the “Courses” tab is for the paid Figure Drawing Online Course. The “Free Stuff” tab has the free stuff not belonging to the “Introduction To Drawing”. Among these are the “Common Mistake” videos, the cut down versions of the 13 lectures and “Work In Progress”.

I have also decided to stop selling the “Lecture 0 – Where To Start” as many of the concepts it contains are now explained (or will be soon) in the free “Introduction To Drawing”.

The website is up and running and I am still testing all the links, so please, if you find something not working, let me know. Enjoy!

Ohhh, yes…and there’s another bit of good news coming in a couple of days. ;–))

Drawing Step By Step

Hello everyone,

I have a few announcements to make. First of all, I have received a huge number of requests to present some learning material on the very basics of figure drawing and drawing in general. I have given it some thought and decided that adding a lesson here and there isn’t exactly what you have in mind or what will help either. So I am in the process of changing the design and structure of figuredrawingonline.com

Apart from the Figure Drawing Course and the free videos that are already there, the website will also have a fairly comprehensive free introduction to drawing called “Drawing Step By Step”. This will be in a form of both, articles and videos. This introduction is designed to take anyone wanting to learn to draw through pretty much everything there is to know about drawing. On the way it also clears up a few misguided popular beliefs and myths.

I have divided the free information in the following 5 categories. For those who are just starting or know little about drawing, it is probably a good idea to read / view the info in order as it is presented. If you are after bits and pieces here and there, the navigation should help to get you there fast. Ok, here are the categories and content:

1/ “Approach To Drawing” gives you an insight into the concepts of drawing.
This includes:
1.1 – There is no such thing as multitasking
1.2 – Drawing is Communication
1.3 – Copying versus Creating
1.4 – Grasping the Complex
1.5 – It’s all in The Realtionships

2/ “Basic Set–Up” gives you a run down on materials, equipment and the space you choose for drawing.
This includes:
2.1 – Materials – paper, drawing tools…
2.2 – Environment – where you do your drawing

3/ “Drawing Basics” is where drawing starts with recommended ways to draw.
This includes:
3.1 – Why Standing?
3.2 – How to hold A Pencil
3.3 – Throw that Eraser

4/ “Drawing Practices” will give you practical tools and “How To”s on anything that came up so far in all the lessons above.
This includes:
4.1/ Is That a Circle?
4.2/ The Straight Line
4.3/ A Cube, not a Square
4.4/ A Ball, not a circle
4.5/ A Cylinder, not a rectangle
4.6/ Basic Perspective
4.7/ How to Steady the Hand
4.8/ Imagine it and See it Everywhere

5/ “Drawing – The Magic” delves into creative devices you can employ to achieve results. These will be demostrated mostly through figure drawing although there will be examples of landscape, urban drawing and still life as well.
This includes:
5.1 – The building Elements – line, plane, mass and countour lines
5.2 – Flick that Light Switch
5.3 – The rule of the Mass – weight, thrust, orientation

You can see I tried to think of all the basics. Even things that seem as simple as “How to hold a pencil” can cause you work much harder than necessary to achieve results.

So, still a fair bit to go, it is a lot of material to write and a lot of videos to shoot, edit, encode, upload, link…. you get the picture. I will probably release the new site when I am halfway through preparing the new lessons and tutorials so that you don’t have to wait too long and finish the rest while the first already available half keeps you busy.
I am still keeping the intro page of he website with the rotating images – I think it is good to see what is within the reach, but the next page to progress to is the Home page. Here is a screen grab of part of the home page:

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